BRIDES FOR BROTHERS by Debbie Macomber

bridesforbrothers
Series: Midnight Sons, #1
Publisher: MIRA
Release Date: October 1995
Source: Purchased
Rating: ★★★★


Hard Luck, Alaska — a Town that Needs Women!

Location: 50 miles north of the Arctic Circle. Population: 150 (mostly men) — but growing! Because the O’Halloran brothers, who run a bush-plane charter service called Midnight Sons, are heading a campaign to bring women to Hard Luck!

Sawyer O’Halloran — He’s the middle brother. Pilot and part owner of Midnight Sons. And, if the truth be told, he’s not entirely in favor of this scheme. But he considers himself immune to the charms of any woman — he’s adamantly against marriage and he’s not too sure about love!

Abbey Sutherland — Single mother of two adorable kids. Veteran of one bad marriage. Wants a new beginning — not a new romance. She responds to the Midnight Sons ad and is delighted to accept their offer. But there’s a complication — or two. She hasn’t told the O’Hallorans she’s arriving with children!


The beginning of the Midnight Sons series set in Alaska, 1995. BRIDES FOR BROTHERS is a sweet romance with a cast of good, down-to-earth people. The O’Halloran brothers who own a plane-charter business in Hard Luck, Alaska hatch a plan to attract women to their remote town. It’s all very innocent and on the up & up. I did have to giggle at the men’s reaction to having fresh womenfolk in their midst. Was it 1895 or 1995? The first to accept their offer is Abbey Sutherland who’s hired to set up a library in Hard Luck. Sawyer O’Halloran takes a liking to her, but of course, there are complications. Overall, just a nice romance to give you a warm, cozy feeling. Looking forward to the next book.

BEHIND HER EYES by Sarah Pinborough

behindhereyes
Publisher: Flatiron Books
Release Date: January 31, 2017
Source: ARC from the publisher
Rating: ★★★★½


Louise is a single mom, a secretary, stuck in a modern-day rut. On a rare night out, she meets a man in a bar and sparks fly. Though he leaves after they kiss, she’s thrilled she finally connected with someone.

When Louise arrives at work on Monday, she meets her new boss, David. The man from the bar. The very married man from the bar…who says the kiss was a terrible mistake but who still can’t keep his eyes off Louise.

And then Louise bumps into Adele, who’s new to town and in need of a friend, but she also just happens to be married to David. David and Adele look like the picture-perfect husband and wife, but then why is David so controlling, and why is Adele so scared of him?

As Louise is drawn into David and Adele’s orbit, she uncovers more puzzling questions than answers. The only thing that is crystal clear is that something in this marriage is very, very wrong, but Louise can’t guess how wrong―and how far a person might go to protect their marriage’s secrets.


BEHIND HER EYES is an AMAZING psychological thriller. Totally addictive, dark, and original. The press release that came with the ARC gave the book a #WTFthatending hashtag, and I was like, sure. We’ll see. So, I spent the whole book putting together theories, going back and rereading parts, thinking that I had figured out the big secret. Ha, NOPE! Not even close.

This is one of those stories that I can’t say anything about without risk of revealing spoilers, so just read the blurb. Then read the book. It gave me a major book hangover. I couldn’t quit thinking about it enough to start something new. Seriously. Fans of suspense/thrillers: read it!

Disclosure: I received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

LUCKY YOU by Erika Carter

luckyyou
Publisher: Counterpoint
Release Date: March 1, 2017
Source: Book of the Month Club Selection
Rating: ★★½


Three women, early twenties, find themselves aimlessly adrift in Erika Carter’s fierce and darkly funny debut novel, Lucky You. Ellie, Chloe and Rachel are friends (sort of); waitresses at the same tired bar in the Arkansas college town they’ve stuck around in too long. Each is becoming unmoored in her own way: Ellie obliterates all feeling with alcohol and self-destructive acts of sexual promiscuity; Chloe pulls out patches of her hair and struggles to keep incipient mental illness at bay; changeable Rachel has fallen under the sway of a messianic boyfriend with whom she’s agreed to live off-grid for a year in order to return to “health” and asks Ellie and Chloe to join them in “The Project”. In a remote, rural house in the Ozarks, nearly undone by boredom and the brewing tension between them, each tries to solve the conundrum of being alive.

By turns funny, knowing and hauntingly sad, Lucky You delivers the kind of study in damage and detachment that made Mary Gaitskill’s Bad Behavior or Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays so memorable. With startling exactitude and wickedly deadpan humor, it lays bare the emotional core of its characters with surgical precision. The writing is deft and controlled, as natural and unforced as breath–which makes it impossible to look away.


I’ve been debating over how to rate this book. (This was my January 2017 Book of the Month Club selection.) It held my attention, but at the same time I had problems with it. It left me shaking my head, thinking what was the point?

Normally I would pass on a book about twenty-somethings trying to find themselves, but LUCKY YOU is set in Arkansas, and I have a thing for Arkansas, especially the Ozark Mountains. So, I gave it a try. The setting was wonderful, loved the descriptions, but the characters and plot were another story.

Ellie, Chloe, and Rachel were just flat-out unpleasant, and their backstories were lacking. It wasn’t clear to me why they behaved as they did. So, they become part of a project, living off the grid to escape the “Old World” and all the “unhealth” in it. Sounds fine, but I was disappointed in the results. The chapters alternate between each woman, then about halfway through, Chloe disappears, and the others have to finish up her story. Why ignore a main character?

Sad story. Sad characters. Unfortunately I missed the dark humor the blurb mentions. Haunting ― maybe, funny ― no.