THE ADDRESS by Fiona Davis

The Address
THE ADDRESS by Fiona Davis
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

THE ADDRESS is an engrossing mystery and family drama with a majestic New York City landmark as its backdrop. The Dakota apartment building on the Upper West Side provides a link between two women one hundred years apart. I enjoyed learning about the history of The Dakota, as well as trying to figure out the century-old murder mystery presented. I loved how the dual time periods were mid-1880s and mid-1980s, so really it’s historical fiction inside historical fiction. Sara and Bailey are both sympathetic and relatable characters. I enjoyed the author’s straight-forward writing style, and the twists revealed at the end were simply delicious. I missed reading Fiona Davis’ debut THE DOLLHOUSE last year, and now I definitely want to pick it up.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book through Penguin’s First to Read Program.

THE SIXTH VICTIM by Tessa Harris (Audiobook)


Publisher: Kensington/Blackstone Audio
Release Date: May 30, 2017
Source: Review copies from the publisher
Rating: ★★★¾


London’s East End, 1888. When darkness falls, terror begins.

The foggy streets of London’s Whitechapel district have become a nocturnal hunting ground for Jack the Ripper, and no woman is safe. Flower girl Constance Piper is not immune to dread, but she is more preoccupied with her own strange experiences of late.

Clairvoyants seem to be everywhere these days. In desperation, even Scotland Yard has turned to them to help apprehend the Ripper. Her mother has found comfort in contacting her late father in a séance. But are such powers real? And could Constance really be possessed of second sight? She longs for the wise counsel of her mentor and champion of the poor, Emily Tindall, but the kind missionary has gone missing.

Following the latest grisly discovery, Constance is contacted by a high-born lady of means who fears the victim may be her missing sister. She implores Constance to use her clairvoyance to help solve the crime, which the press is calling “the Whitechapel Mystery”, attributing the murder to the Ripper.

As Constance becomes embroiled in intrigue far more sinister than she could have imagined, assistance comes in a startling manner that profoundly challenges her assumptions about the nature of reality. She’ll need all the help she can get – because there may be more than one depraved killer out there.


A poor flower girl named Constance with the gift of clairvoyance is searching for her missing teacher on the streets of Jack the Ripper’s London in Tessa Harris’ historical mystery THE SIXTH VICTIM. At the same time, an upper crust lady enlists Constance’s help in finding her missing sister, fearing she may be the sixth victim of the deranged murderer.

This was an audio/eBook combo read for me. I enjoy Victorian mysteries, and this was a good one, definitely pulls readers into the dark and grizzly happenings of the time. Confusing at first, the book took me a few chapters before I felt comfortable with the characters and story, though overall I liked it. Constance is an intriguing and sympathetic character, and the perfect heroine for this new series.

The audiobook was performed by two narrators, Fiona Hardingham and Gemma Dawson. Their accents and inflections for the many characters helped make this an entertaining story. Eerie and gruesome!

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley (eBook) and the publisher (audiobook) in exchange for an honest review.

THE LOST LETTER by Jillian Cantor


Publisher: Riverhead Books
Release Date: June 13, 2017
Source: Penguin’s First to Read Program
Rating: ★★★★½


A historical novel of love and survival inspired by real resistance workers during World War II Austria, and the mysterious love letter that connects generations of Jewish families. A heart-breaking, heart-warming read for fans of The Women in the Castle, Lilac Girls, and Sarah’s Key.

Austria, 1938. Kristoff is a young apprentice to a master Jewish stamp engraver. When his teacher disappears during Kristallnacht, Kristoff is forced to engrave stamps for the Germans, and simultaneously works alongside Elena, his beloved teacher’s fiery daughter, and with the Austrian resistance to send underground messages and forge papers. As he falls for Elena amidst the brutal chaos of war, Kristoff must find a way to save her, and himself.

Los Angeles, 1989. Katie Nelson is going through a divorce and while cleaning out her house and life in the aftermath, she comes across the stamp collection of her father, who recently went into a nursing home. When an appraiser, Benjamin, discovers an unusual World War II-era Austrian stamp placed on an old love letter as he goes through her dad’s collection, Katie and Benjamin are sent on a journey together that will uncover a story of passion and tragedy spanning decades and continents, behind the just fallen Berlin Wall.

A romantic, poignant and addictive novel, The Lost Letter shows the lasting power of love.


Three words: beautiful, moving, and bittersweet. This book is a unique tale of the Austrian Resistance during World War II, centering around the love story between the daughter of a Jewish stamp maker and his apprentice. THE LOST LETTER is really historical fiction within historical fiction; the story alternates between the fall of the Berlin Wall (late 80s/early 90s) and the German invasion of Austria (late 1930s).

In 1989, Katie Nelson, whose life has been upended by her divorce and caring for an ailing father, finds a curious stamp on a letter from the World War II era in her father’s extensive stamp collection. With the help of an appraiser named Benjamin, Katie is able to uncover the story behind the mysterious letter.

I enjoyed this book very much, and was intrigued by both Katie and Benjamin in 1989, and Elena and Kristoff in 1939. What secrets did the stamp and letter hold? This book was a lovely blend of mystery, romance, and history. I do love vintage stamps, and this book gave readers a look at the intricacies of stamp engraving, and how they were miniature works of art. Highly recommended!

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book through Penguin’s First to Read Program in exchange for an honest review.