SILVER THAW by Catherine Anderson

silverthaw
Series: Mystic Creek, #1
Publisher: Signet
Release Date: January 6, 2015
Source: Borrowed from the library
Rating: ★★


After years of living in fear of her husband, Amanda Banning has left him and moved to Mystic Creek, Oregon, for a fresh start. But she’s having a tough time providing for herself and her six-year-old daughter. Writing her secret yearnings on slips of paper and sending them into the wind helps her cling to the hope that things will get better…and that she can find happiness again.

Jeb Sterling has no idea that the handwritten messages he finds scattered across his land are the first hints that his life is about to change. Nor does he understand why he feels so compelled to help Amanda Banning and her daughter when a cold snap leaves them temporarily homeless. Maybe he’s inspired by Amanda’s courage or perhaps by her beautiful brown eyes. Either way, the man who once renounced love suddenly finds himself willing to do anything for the pair. Amanda seems to have given up on her dreams, but Jeb refuses to quit until he makes her every wish come true.


I enjoyed the beginning of this book: secret messages on pink paper blowing in the breeze, a potential “stranded in a snowstorm” romance, and a beautiful Oregon setting. Unfortunately, my joy was short-lived. The story moved sooo slowly. I think at least a hundred pages could have been cut out. After the much anticipated showdown with the bad guy just past the halfway mark, it was just plain boring.

SILVER THAW was the first book I’ve read by Catherine Anderson. Is she a Christian Romance author? I would definitely put this book in the Christian Romance genre, though it wasn’t tagged as such in the library.

I was hoping this book would be similar to Robyn Carr’s Virgin River series, but it didn’t even come close!! I’m giving it two stars, and my two stars = nah.

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6 thoughts on “SILVER THAW by Catherine Anderson

  1. I read this and thought it was good. Though I chose it when I was looking for a “comfort” read, so it fit the mood. She isn’t considered Christian– she’s considered clean romance, I think. I put her in the basket with Debbie Macomber, who is definitely “sweeter” than Robyn Carr.

    • OK, makes sense. In this book, there wasn’t a meal or snack that went by without a lot of praying, so I thought she might be Christian romance. I’ve been wanting to read more of Debbie Macomber’s books set in Alaska.

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